Disruption in Education: It’s a good thing, and it’s more than a buzzword

This post was originally published in International Literacy Association's Literacy Today magazine.  Google defines disruption as a “disturbance or problems that interrupt an event, activity, or process”. We need to look at disruption as a concept to use and implement in education, not as a problem, but as a strategy to formulate solutions to current … Continue reading Disruption in Education: It’s a good thing, and it’s more than a buzzword

Resources to Teach about The #MuslimBan

Many educators are often afraid of discussing "controversial" issues in the classroom. The word "controversial" here puts a shroud on many relevant topics, such as politics, daily events, history, social justice issues, equality, and many others. What are you so afraid of? Having a healthy debate in the classroom? shouldn't students be exposed to different … Continue reading Resources to Teach about The #MuslimBan

Five Ways to Advocate for Justice in Education

This post was originally published on Teaching Tolerance.  “We live in a time of crisis,” warned Dr. Ruha Benjamin in the beginning of her opening keynote at the 2016 International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference. Benjamin, an assistant professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University and author of People’s … Continue reading Five Ways to Advocate for Justice in Education

The Toughest Lessons Learned: Conversations on Race

“In a sense the limitations of Orientalism are, as I said earlier, the limitations that follow upon disregarding, essentializing, denuding the humanity of another culture, people, or geographical region.” ~ Edward Said The first time I read Edward Said's "Orientalism" was when I was doing my Master's in Literature, back in 2008. I remember signing … Continue reading The Toughest Lessons Learned: Conversations on Race